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"Ultimate" Steel Bench block/Anvil

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    "Ultimate" Steel Bench block/Anvil

    My current "armorers block" is this spool of wire placed on the corner of my desk above the leg. Adequate, in a pinch, but just barely. benchblockwire.jpg
    The steel bench blocks available on-line don’t interest me.

    I finally purchased a legit armorers bench block and picked it up yesterday.

    Pulled this from our scrap load at work today; 8X8 inches square by 1" 5/32nd to 1" 10/32nd thick, 23 lbs 2 ounces. I’ll have to have it milled to create a surface of uniform thickness that is perfectly flat. I should end up with just over an inch thick 8x8 square at that point.
    benchblocktop.jpg benchblocklegit.jpg
    benchblockfront.jpg benchblockrear.jpg


    My inclination to create a surface with superior blow absorption qualities and “deadness” is as follows.

    Hollow/mill out a void, 1/2 inch deep leaving a 1/4 inch wide edge on all four sides with a 3/16th inch deep by 1/8" wide ledge for a cap. Fill the void with lead. Seal the lead filled void with the 3/16th inch thick steel cap, welded in place. Mill that side one more time just enough to create a perfectly flat surface total weight at 26.5 - 28 pounds by my estimate.

    BOOOOM!!! ULTIMATE ARMORERS DEAD BLOW BENCH BLOCK !!! ONLY 3 payments of a bunch of your greenbacks, get yours today! Not available in some areas, free pick up available on request. Order now, supplies are limited!!!


    I am inclined to believe that the added density of the lead will create a surface that will be superior in its “deadness” to steel alone. What say ye? Would all the extra work of adding a void to fill with lead etc. be a waste of time? Is my compulsion to create a better product than I can buy, leading me to false conclusions, self delusion and unreasonable expectations? I plan on having the mill work done in a one to three weeks. That depends on access to equipment.
    Last edited by Letereat; 09-05-2020, 04:21 AM.
    The meaning of life: To be happy and useful.

    #2
    I'm more "electrical" than mechanical so take this with a grain of powder..... I think the milling and filling is a lot of work and expense for minimal gain. Wood is cheap and does a decent job to lower vibrations - a section of old bowling alley works great if you can find it. Lead is heavy and will deaden vibrations ... some machine bases are filled with lead shot to add weight and anti-vib properties. I think more weight with some wood is cheap and easy. Getting it anchored down is critical .... you don't want to create any spring boards.

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      #3
      I agree with pond scum. I don't think the effort would equal the rewards. Just blanchard grind or surface grind that block of steel you have and call it good.
      "The kindest, most sensitive guy on the entire internet."

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        #4
        I agree with Pond Scum and PHM. But if you are an engineer I understand.
        In memory of our Founder, Michael T. June 15, 1946 - February 26, 2017

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          #5
          Originally posted by Reginald Carstairs View Post
          I agree with Pond Scum and PHM. But if you are an engineer I understand.
          Ouch! An arrow right to the heart! Or should I say brain?

          Comment


            #6
            Letereat... It is overkill for an armorer's block. Smooth the top and break the edges. Drill a few different sized holes for drifting pins. Perhaps a .250" x 1.500" slot through it, maybe even a V groove for the small round things you may need to work on. Anything that block couldn't handle gun smithing-wise, and you are looking at needing another tool.
            My blocks are much smaller and narrower, made from aluminium that has a layer of leather glued to the top. They have a small dado along the sides so I can clamp them up in a vise for more serious beating and s tep on one end for hooking onto the edge of a bench top so it doesn't slide. They work great for everything gun related.

            In memory of our Founder, Michael T. June 15, 1946 - February 26, 2017.

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              #7
              Steel bench block/anvil, "serious beating", for gun smithing?? Just go with 1911s & don't need no stinkin' tools!!
              Think Green.......Recycle Congress

              Certified Armed Infidel

              Right Wing Extremist

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                #8
                Originally posted by Pond Scum View Post
                Ouch! An arrow right to the heart! Or should I say brain?
                Vision......Fading.....Must.......close MIND!!!!​​​​
                After knocking a few pins in and out;I will concede that adding a lead filled void would indeed be overkill and a waste of time and resources. I'm just tapping pins out and some light hammering on occasion, not driving tiny hot rivets. Blanchard grinding, news to me! That would be a great option especially if its significantly less than milling. I'll have to check with the local shops, certainly seems like it would be much faster.
                I am no engineer, welding is my trade, my Avatar is one of my welds. I come from a family of Programmers, Scientist, Techno geeks, Engineers of all sorts, Musicians, Administrators, Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, one used Helicopter parts broker, in this area for and dating back to the Inception of TVA and the Manhattan project, though, so its in my blood. A vice, sent back a vacuum base articulated last week, great on an engineered or highly polished surface, a fail on a wood surface. Opting for a clamp on.
                For Stable mounting, of the Steel block to the desktop; the not so often used (for securing things down anyway) and usually forgotten force of magnetism is it.
                ​​ MJ-150drawing.pdf

                A combination of N42 neodymium switch and permanent magnets over a 1/8" gap. Counter sunk into the bottom of each surface. Small but load of pulling force, over a small area, two or three anchor points should be enough. An N42 grade neodymium 2" diameter by .5 inch thick one will exert 95 pounds of pulling force in direct contact with my block. The air gap obviously alters things. Got some on the way for testing. Groves/slots in the block and other modifications such as pockets for parts etc. are all on the table. Not following you on the holes for drift pins though TuxAir, for storage, drifting sights, punching pins, or traditional drifting aka hole alignment pins, please elaborate.



                Sent from my Altair 8800 using binary, hexadecimal and some FORTRAN
                Attached Files
                Last edited by Letereat; 09-17-2020, 01:05 AM.
                The meaning of life: To be happy and useful.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Not following you on the holes for drift pins though TuxAir, for storage, drifting sights, punching pins, or traditional drifting aka hole alignment pins, please elaborate.
                  Just some strategically placed holes drilled into the block so any pins you may want to drift out have some space to extend in to as you tap them out.

                  In memory of our Founder, Michael T. June 15, 1946 - February 26, 2017.

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                    #10
                    Yes, of course, plenty if room for that.
                    The meaning of life: To be happy and useful.

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                      #11
                      Well poop. This project has stalled and slowed to a glide. My ambitions exceed my ability, its a common occurrence. Lead in a machined out void, ridiculous.
                      I have made a proof of concept for securing with magnets, still a go.
                      I decided to make a prototype bench block out of wood first, I have drills, drill presses, routers etc, when I get that dialed in THEN I will make my finished piece out of steel. I am still convinced I can create a much more functional and useful armorers block than what is available to purchase.
                      The meaning of life: To be happy and useful.

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