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American Classic II, Don't Underestimate

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  • Reginald Carstairs
    started a topic American Classic II, Don't Underestimate

    American Classic II, Don't Underestimate

    American Classic II... Don't Underestimate this pistol due to its price. I got this new for $375.00 but even at today's cost, it's a good shooter in my book.
    I think I'm over 2000 rounds, most of them reloads. Only two times it didn't fire, bad primers were at fault.


    bc ac2.jpg

  • bersatoter
    replied
    Must have been a typo...The Boeing B52 over Berlin in WWII? Nice pistol OP!

    Leave a comment:


  • jimku
    replied
    Originally posted by mitchr View Post

    Yeah, she carries cocked & locked.
    Well, then she still has something to learn. And I hope she survives the incident that will teach her, and unharmed!

    Leave a comment:


  • mitchr
    replied
    Originally posted by jimku View Post

    Did she learn anything from that little episode?
    Yeah, she carries cocked & locked.

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  • jimku
    replied
    Originally posted by mitchr View Post
    Marty practiced with her empty P238. Now, I have a .380 size hole in my overhead shop door! Just thankful that she did think to go outside when she did it with a live round & it didn't hit anything important in my shop.

    She carries it cocked & locked, as I do with my P938 & 1911.
    Did she learn anything from that little episode?

    Leave a comment:


  • mitchr
    replied
    Marty practiced with her empty P238. Now, I have a .380 size hole in my overhead shop door! Just thankful that she did think to go outside when she did it with a live round & it didn't hit anything important in my shop.

    She carries it cocked & locked, as I do with my P938 & 1911.

    Leave a comment:


  • jimku
    replied
    History of the 1911


    Video removed, no link. RC
    Last edited by Reginald Carstairs; 04-26-2019, 05:07 PM.

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  • PHMadness
    replied


    Originally posted by Reginald Carstairs View Post
    I think everyone should carry their firearm the way they want to.
    I agree completely. I simply don't care anymore, and it's none of my business anyway. I do carry a 1911 cocked and locked as well, but I haven't carried mine regularly in years now. Maybe I should start again...

    Interestingly, many don't know that the original design submitted for testing to the military didn't have a thumb safety, only the grip safety.

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  • jimku
    replied
    Originally posted by Reginald Carstairs View Post

    I carry cocked and locked, but John Browning actually designed the 1911 to be carried in the hammer down then half-cocked condition. Very few people I talk to know this, they generally say cocked and locked. I understand that when Al Gore invented the internet all firearms facts would fly out the window.

    I think everyone should carry their firearm the way they want to.
    I got into this discussion on the 1911 forum. When I said I carried hammer down or sometimes in the half cock notch, I got more flack than a lone B52 over Berlin in WWII. Some of them got downright personal and nasty. I was called almost every derogatory reference to intelligence in the book. A lot of them took it as a personal affront. When I mentioned that John Browning actually designed the gun to be carried that way, they used every means to evade that, obfuscate it, rationalize around it, ignore it and deny it. Convinced me that the 1911 forum is populated by jerks, idiots and … well, let's just say I lost respect for that forum. You, Reginald, are a cut above that herd!! Thank you!!

    And mitchr, you are right about there being a danger in letting the hammer down on a 1911. One should practice it many many many times with an unloaded gun until absolutely certain you have it down pat and won't screw up! I have done that. My technique involves hooking my right thumb clear over the entire hammer so it has ahold of the hammer face … good and solid so it can't slip, solidly grabbing the gun with my left hand wrapped around my right fingers and my left index finger in front of the trigger guard, depressing the grip safety with left thumb and squeezing my grip on the gun between my left thumb and index finger, then squeezing the trigger and letting the hammer "roll" down along my right thumb, not engaging the spur with that thumb until the hammer is a good half way down, and releasing the trigger at that point so even if I do slip it will end up in the half-cock notch. Before I worked out that technique, one time after cleaning the gun, my thumb did slip and I blew the heel off of one of my cowboy boots that was sitting on the floor. Killed that boot dead. That gun had a bobbed spur hammer. My current gun has a Wilson Combat skeletonized combat hammer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Reginald Carstairs
    replied
    Originally posted by jimku View Post

    Agreed. but I still prefer to carry with hammer down. I can thumb-cock it every bit as fast I can disengage the safety.
    I carry cocked and locked, but John Browning actually designed the 1911 to be carried in the hammer down then half-cocked condition. Very few people I talk to know this, they generally say cocked and locked. I understand that when Al Gore invented the internet all firearms facts would fly out the window.

    I think everyone should carry their firearm the way they want to.

    Leave a comment:


  • mitchr
    replied
    My issue with carrying with hammer down, is not in cocking it, but decocking it. 'Course, I'm a born klutz & I don't trust myself on letting the hammer down on a live round, especially with these nubby "skeleton" hammers. A spur hammer might be ok.

    Leave a comment:


  • jimku
    replied
    Originally posted by mitchr View Post
    Don't have to spend any money on them for accuracy. I'm no marksman, but a range officer shot a 3 leaf clover that could be covered with a quarter, using my stock ACII, except for a 16# Wolff recoil spring & a new mag release. It was at about 6:30 in the 2" bullseye at 21 ft. & he said, "shoots a bit low".
    Agreed. Not needed. But mine will do that at 25 yards shooting from a pistol rest well, maybe not 3-leaf clover but 4,5 or 6 leaf clover . And its trigger is downright heaven. Another benefit with the Wilson Combat hammer and hammer strut is that it is MUCH easier to thumb-cock from hammer-down position (WC uses a different hammer/strut geometry). I am very old-school and for me, cardinal rule #1 is NEVER RELY ON ANY SAFETY. I know a 1911 has very robust safeties but I still prefer to carry with hammer down. I can thumb-cock it every bit as fast I can disengage the safety.

    Leave a comment:


  • mitchr
    replied
    Don't have to spend any money on them for accuracy. I'm no marksman, but a range officer shot a 3 leaf clover that could be covered with a quarter, using my stock ACII, except for a 16# Wolff recoil spring & a new mag release. It was at about 6:30 in the 2" bullseye at 21 ft. & he said, "shoots a bit low".

    Leave a comment:


  • jimku
    replied
    Originally posted by Reginald Carstairs View Post
    Wow, I wouldn't call it an out of the box ACll

    You basically turned it into a custom shop firearm.

    I bet it's a fine shooter. I can tell you are proud to own it.




    Sent from the mothership.
    It is definitely not an out of the box ACII. But I like to post it in forums like this just to show that the ACII really is mil spec and that top quality 1911 parts will work in it just fine. It adds another dimension to the ACII as a GREAT basic platform to transform into the equivalent of most any custom shop gun without spending a couple grand to get there. And yes, I am very proud of it. And yes, it is a fine shooter. As for accuracy, well, it has proven to be right in there with Les Baer and several others by guys at the range with those guns who have shot it side by side with theirs. For best accuracy, the one thing that I would recommend to any ACII owner is to invest in a Wilson Combat Bullet Proof barrel bushing and have a good gunsmith custom fit it to the slide and barrel.

    Leave a comment:


  • Reginald Carstairs
    replied
    Wow, I wouldn't call it an out of the box ACll

    You basically turned it into a custom shop firearm.

    I bet it's a fine shooter. I can tell you are proud to own it.




    Sent from the mothership.

    Leave a comment:

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