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Gunsmith Duties in Your Branch of the Service

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    Gunsmith Duties in Your Branch of the Service

    Today my son asked me "Who takes care of the guns in the Navy?" My Dad served as a Corsair Pilot on the USS Intrepid and he lives far away so it wasn't convenient to ask him. That, and I'm sure things have changed since WWII. But it occurred to me that the Navy must have a special designation for the man in charge of that duty.

    So who takes care of the weapons in each branch of the Service? And how does one train to become a military gunsmith? What is the proper nomenclature/terminology?

    #2
    Re: Gunsmith Duties in Your Branch of the Service

    Traditionally aboard ship, a Gunner's Mate is responsible for maintenance and operation of small arms, machine guns and even the big boomers. Yet in modern warfare, the Navy also has Fire Control Technicians to operate and maintain sophisticated electronic controls and Missile Technicians for that type of warfare. On flattops and naval air stations, an Aviation Ordinanceman is called upon to handle and service the guns, missiles and bombs. And yes, they've got schools for that.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...s_Navy_ratings
    Last edited by gun sane; 07-21-2017, 07:56 PM.
    Never give the devil a ride. He will always want to drive.

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      #3
      Re: Gunsmith Duties in Your Branch of the Service

      Thanks, Gunsane. I've always had the inclination to build guns, but had neither the training nor the talent. My son is 17. I believe a couple of years in the Navy would convince my son that he really wants to grow up

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        #4
        Re: Gunsmith Duties in Your Branch of the Service

        In the Marine during my hitch (59 to 89) armorers secured, issued, repaired, adapted all handguns and long guns. it might have changed ove the past 28 years, but I doubt it.

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          #5
          Re: Gunsmith Duties in Your Branch of the Service

          Originally posted by FakeBersaName View Post
          Thanks, Gunsane. I've always had the inclination to build guns, but had neither the training nor the talent. My son is 17. I believe a couple of years in the Navy would convince my son that he really wants to grow up
          Yep... What GunSane said. Just to be clear, most of those folks in the military were armorers, not necessarily smiths. Meaning they were parts changers, not parts makers. Heck... in the USMC unit I was in, we did the replacement of parts and assembly ourselves under the supervision of an armorer. This was a collateral duty since our unit was so small.

          As for your boy, or anyone's child, a few years will do good.

          In memory of our Founder, Michael T. June 15, 1946 - February 26, 2017.

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            #6
            Re: Gunsmith Duties in Your Branch of the Service

            Originally posted by TuxAir View Post
            As for your boy, or anyone's child, a few years will do good.
            ^^^ +1 ^^^ any branch
            Long story short, jab is a male.
            Active member in Bersa Forums since 03-13-2005.

            Certified Armed Infidel

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              #7
              Re: Gunsmith Duties in Your Branch of the Service

              When I was in the army, our weapons were surface to air missiles (S.A.M.). Required 42 weeks training & they called us radar/control technicians.


              Seriously, contact your local recruiter. He can probably give you the M.O.S. & any info you need. Don't know if it has changed, but when I enlisted, if you qualified for a particular MOS/training, etc., you were guaranteed to get it, prior to signing your life away. Other branches didn't off that.
              Think Green.......Recycle Congress

              Certified Armed Infidel

              Right Wing Extremist

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                #8
                Re: Gunsmith Duties in Your Branch of the Service

                Originally posted by mitchr View Post
                ....if you qualified for a particular MOS/training, etc., you were guaranteed to get it, prior to signing your life away. Other branches didn't off that.
                I don't know how many men got sucked into the Navy with that bait, but one of the papers you signed when joining stated that you wouldn't hold the Navy responsible for any promise the recruiter made.
                Last edited by gun sane; 07-22-2017, 01:03 AM.
                Never give the devil a ride. He will always want to drive.

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                  #9
                  Re: Gunsmith Duties in Your Branch of the Service

                  Originally posted by gun sane View Post
                  I don't know how many men got sucked into the Navy with that bait, but one of the papers you signed when joining stated that you wouldn't hold the Navy responsible for any promise the recruiter made.
                  I was advised of that regarding Navy, Air Force & Marines, but my enlistment papers that I signed, specified the MOS I wanted. I will point out that the equipment my recruiter sold me on was already obsolete! When I finished basic & reported to Bliss, in El Paso, I was informed that I would receive the training, as promised, but on graduation I would be made a truck driver, cook, or such. They offered me a school on more advanced equipment and was in the electronics field, as I wanted, so I signed the waiver & took it. I'd consider it a bait & switch issue, but at least the switch was a step up.
                  Think Green.......Recycle Congress

                  Certified Armed Infidel

                  Right Wing Extremist

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                    #10
                    Re: Gunsmith Duties in Your Branch of the Service

                    Originally posted by TuxAir View Post
                    Yep... What GunSane said. Just to be clear, most of those folks in the military were armorers, not necessarily smiths. Meaning they were parts changers, not parts makers.

                    As for your boy, or anyone's child, a few years will do good.
                    +1.

                    During my stint as a Gunner's Mate in the late '70s, as armorers we kept the ship's beater 1911s and M14 serviceable . . . usually by swapping in other used parts until a decent working combo was found. New parts required a requisition, typically denied. An actual 'Gunsmith', at least in the Navy, was nonexistent!

                    And this was on the 7th Fleet Flagship!
                    God made the Garand!

                    USN Gunner's Mate 1976-80

                    Moderator - nevadashooters.com

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